Summer CSA Share – #27

Welcome to the 27th and final share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Celeriac
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Parsnips
  • Garlic
  • Lacinato Kale
  • Sage
  • Yellow Onions
  • Butternut Winter Squash
  • Pie Pumpkin
  • Corn Flour or Polenta

Somehow we’ve arrived at the final share of the season, and the very last CSA share of Pitchfork & Crow.  It’s been a wild ride these past nine years, and past eight years with the CSA.  We’ve made countless new friendships, grown thousands of pounds of food, and done our very best to figure out the mysteries of agriculture.  If I’ve done my math correctly, this marks our 274th CSA share.  Two hundred and seventy-four CSA harvests and distributions. No wonder I feel tired.

Five members have been with us all eight years of the CSA, and another five have been with us since year two.  We’ve had 295 members come and go, or stay on, over the full eight years.  We’ve seen kids grow up and get born.  We’ve seen friendships between members fostered.  We’ve attended one member’s funeral and one member’s wedding.  We created a community around this farm thanks to your support.

I feel like there are no words to express my gratitude to all of our current and former CSA members in this moment.  You bought into our ideas before there was proof, and you continued to believe in us even when we faltered.  We thank you for that.  Please take that support to other local farmers who continue the good fight to bring you real food.  One last time, thank you for all of your support.  We really, truly could not have done this without you.

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Carol Deppe’s Cornbread Recipe

1 c water
¼ c ghee or butter
5/8 t salt
2 Large eggs
2 c corn flour
2 t baking powder

Preheat oven to 450 with rack at lowest setting. Grind 1 heaping cup flour corn. Put 2/3 c in large metal bowl; put the rest in smaller metal bowl and whisk with baking powder. Put water, ghee and salt in pot on stove on high, covered. Put small skillet in oven. Scramble the eggs in a small bowl. When water boils and ghee melts, pour this into large metal bowl with the 2/3 c corn flour and whisk. Let sit 1 minute. Then whisk in the eggs. Then take skillet out of oven. Add the corn flour/baking powder mix to big bowl and whisk together quickly (2 seconds), then immediately pour into hot skillet, quickly smooth it flat and return to oven (bottom rack). Bake for 15 minutes. Invert skillet over cooling rack and bread will fall out. Cool 10-20 minutes, then slice and eat. Keep at room temp for 3 days or in fridge for a week. Heat in steam oven before eating.

From Living Earth Farm’s website via Carol Deppe, http://www.thelivingearthfarm.com/prod/?q=node%2F218

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Skillet Phyllo Pie with Butternut Squash, Kale, and Goat Cheese

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for brushing
  • 2 medium red onions, finely chopped
  • 1/2 small butternut squash (about 1 pound), peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 bunch Tuscan kale, ribs and stems removed, thinly sliced crosswise
  • 2 large eggs, beaten to blend
  • 3 ounces Parmesan, grated
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 8 ounces frozen phyllo pastry, thawed (half a 1-pound package)
  • 4 ounces fresh goat cheese or feta, crumbled

Place a rack in lower third of oven; preheat to 400°F. Heat 3 Tbsp. oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium. Add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened but not browned, 6–8 minutes. Add squash and cook, stirring occasionally, until almost tender, 8–10 minutes. Mix in thyme and red pepper flakes and transfer to a medium bowl; let cool. Wipe out and reserve skillet.

Add kale, eggs, Parmesan, and lemon zest to squash mixture and gently mix to combine; season with salt and pepper. Layer phyllo sheets inside reserved skillet. Spoon kale-and-squash mixture into phyllo and dot top with goat cheese. Brush edges of phyllo lightly with oil and fold over filling, overlapping slightly, leaving center exposed.

Cook pie over medium heat until bottom of pastry is just golden (carefully lift up on one side with a heatproof rubber spatula so that you can take a peek), about 3 minutes. Transfer skillet to oven and bake pie until kale is wilted and tender and phyllo is golden brown and crisp, 20–25 minutes. Let pie cool in skillet at least 15 minutes before slicing into wedges.

Do Ahead

Pie can be baked 6 hours ahead. Let cool; store uncovered at room temperature.

From Epicurous via by Anna Jones, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/skillet-phyllo-pie-with-butternut-squash-kale-and-goat-cheese

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Roasted Celery Root, Red Onions, Mushrooms, and Sage

  • 3 medium red onions (about 1 1/2 pounds total)
  • 3 pounds celery root (sometimes called celeriac)
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 1 pound small white mushrooms
  • 1/2 pound assorted fresh exotic mushrooms such as chanterelles and Portobellos
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh sage leaves

Cut onions into 1-inch pieces. With a sharp knife peel celery root and cut into 2- by 1/2-inch sticks. Divide celery root between 2 large roasting pans and toss each half with 1 tablespoon oil and 1 teaspoon salt. Roast celery root in upper and lower thirds of oven, stirring occasionally and switching position of pans halfway through roasting, 25 minutes total.

In a bowl toss mushrooms and onions with sage, remaining 3 tablespoons oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Divide mushroom mixture between pans, tossing with celery root, and roast, stirring occasionally and switching position of pans halfway through roasting, about 30 minutes total, or until all vegetables are tender and golden.

Season vegetables with salt and pepper.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/roasted-celery-root-red-onions-mushrooms-and-sage-14454

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Summer CSA Share – #26

Welcome to the 26th share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

P&C Pork Combo Packs –  We didn’t sell all of the available pork last month, so now you’ve got a second chance to buy P&C pork, this time in smaller quantities!  We’ve put together two sizes of combo packs that include bacon, sausage, pork chops, and roasts.  Click here for all the details and send us an email at farmers@pitchforkandcrow.com if you’d like to buy a combo pack.

Somehow we’ve made it to the penultimate share of the season, and of the farm.  Just one more share to harvest and distribute before we end the CSA chapter of Pitchfork & Crow.  Admittedly it’s bittersweet, all these endings.  I’ve been trying to be “present” and “in the moment” for these final days in this work.  Although I still do not know what the future holds next, I know it could never be as fulfilling and tiring and all-consuming as farming has been.

This week’s stormy weather has felt like the perfect accompaniment to this time on the farm.  Gorgeous sunshine one minute, dark rain clouds the next, and gusts of wind that could knock you over.  As the winter looms ahead with its long dark nights and unpredictable weather, this feels like the right time to be wrapping up loose ends and hunkering down for a bit as we contemplate what’s next.

As we plan for the final share, we want to make sure you know we’re offering up custom bulk harvests.  Need more squash for the winter months?  Looking for vegetables for your Thanksgiving meal?  Click here to check out the details.  We’ll have orders at next week’s CSA pick-up and local Lebanon folks will need to pick-up at the farm.  Please note that orders must be emailed to us by Sunday Nov. 19th.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week for the final share!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Very Versatile Baked Beans with Cabbage

  • 1 pound dried medium or large beans, soaked at least 4 hours in plenty of water, drained
  • 11 garlic cloves, 5 smashed, 6 sliced
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 6 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 medium white onions, thinly sliced, or a combination of onions and fennel bulbs (about 3 cups)
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 medium head savoy cabbage, cored, cubed (about 8 cups)
  • 1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes
  • 1 bunch parsley, dill, or cilantro, finely chopped

Cover beans, smashed garlic, and bay leaves with about 1″ water in a large pot. Add 3 Tbsp. oil. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and bring to a simmer. Cover pot partially and cook, adding more hot water as needed to keep beans covered, until beans are nearly done. Add large pinches of salt to taste toward end of cook time, which will vary depending on the bean; start tasting after about 30 minutes. Remove from heat and cover.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Heat remaining 3 Tbsp. oil in a Dutch oven or large ovenproof dish over medium-high. Add onions, red pepper, and 1/2 tsp. salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are reduced and beginning to caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add sliced garlic and cook until golden brown, about 5 minutes more. Add wine and cook until slightly reduced, about 1 minute. Add cabbage and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, crushing with a wooden spoon or cutting with scissors into coarse chunks. Add beans and their liquid, then cover with water until beans and vegetables are just submerged; season to taste with salt. Bring to a boil, cover, and transfer to oven.

Bake beans 1 hour and 20 minutes. Uncover and continue to bake until liquid is slightly reduced and beans are completely tender, 15–30 minutes more. Let cool slightly to thicken, then stir in parsley just before serving.

From Epicurous by Lukas Volger, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/very-versatile-baked-beans-with-cabbage

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Winter Squash Mash

  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 2 3/4- to 3-pound kabocha squash, halved crosswise, seeded
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 cup (or more) low-salt chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, divided

Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray large rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray. Drizzle 1 tablespoon olive oil inside each kabocha squash half and brush to coat. Place squash halves, cut side down, on prepared baking sheet. Roast until squash is very tender when pierced with knife, about 1 hour 10 minutes. Cool slightly. Scoop out squash flesh into bowl and mash until almost smooth.

Melt butter in skillet over medium-high heat until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Add garlic and thyme and stir 1 minute. Add butter mixture and 1 cup broth to squash and mash until smooth. Season generously with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 2 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Add more broth if desired and rewarm in microwave before continuing.)

Stir 2 tablespoons parsley into squash. Sprinkle squash with remaining 1 tablespoon parsley and serve.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/winter-squash-mash-230946

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Seared Rainbow Chard with Leeks

  • 2 (1-lb) bunches rainbow chard or red and green Swiss chard
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large leeks (white and pale green parts only), halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt

Cut stems from chard (if leaves are large, cut out coarse portions of rib), then cut stems crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Stack chard leaves and roll into cylinders. Cut cylinders crosswise to make 1-inch-thick strips of leaves.

Heat butter and oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then sauté chard stems and leeks with sea salt and pepper to taste, stirring occasionally, until slightly soft, 3 to 5 minutes.

Add chard leaves and continue to sauté, stirring frequently, until wilted. (If greens begin to brown before they wilt, sprinkle with a few drops of water.)

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/seared-rainbow-chard-with-leeks-103721

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Summer CSA Share – #25

Welcome to the 25th share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Parsnips
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Popcorn – You can knock the kernels off the cob and into a paper bag and pop this in the microwave.  We’ve had fun watching them pop on the cob too!  Most often we’ll use these directions and pop it on the stovetop.
  • Sunchokes – These are roots of a sunflower variety.  We enjoy them shredded and sauteed but they’re good raw, roasted, and in soups too.  Please note that they contain high levels of the carbohydrate inulin, which is difficult for some folks to digest, but is thought to be a good alternative for diabetics looking to avoid starch.  Here’s a post about how one fellow CSA member learned to love the sunchoke.
  • Broccoli Side Shoots
  • Garlic
  • Superschmelz Kohlrabi This variety description says it all.
  • Collards
  • Onion
  • Poblano Peppers
  • Candystick Delicata Winter Squash

P&C Pork Combo Packs –  We didn’t sell all of the available pork last month, so now you’ve got a second chance to buy P&C pork, this time in smaller quantities!  We’ve put together two sizes of combo packs that include bacon, sausage, pork chops, and roasts.  Click here for all the details and send us an email at farmers@pitchforkandcrow.com if you’d like to buy a combo pack.

I came across a note yesterday where I had written “Nov. 5th – 10 hours of daylight”.  Given that it was the sixth of November, the scribbled message caught my eye.  What had I missed?  But quickly realized I hadn’t missed anything, it had just begun.  The winter gardening guru Eliot Coleman calls it the Persephone days, when the daylight drops below 10 hours a day and most plants stop actively growing.  There are variations on the story of Persephone, but she is definitely associated with the seasonal cycles of life and death.  These dark days are representative of her time in the underworld.  Quite a dramatic name for a phenomenon most of us don’t readily recognize.

The implications of days with less than 10 hours of daylight are clear when you’re striving to grow plants through the winter months of course.  For us November 5th marks the day we should have had our winter crops grown to the appropriate overwintering stage.  The winter radishes and cabbages should be fully grown, the overwintering cauliflower should be large enough to fully mature come spring but not so large that the plants succumb to the winter weather ahead.  It’s amazing what we can grow through the winter months here in our generally mild climate.  Given a little forethought and the right varieties for cold weather growing, we can eat locally and seasonally right through the Persephone days.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Citrus Collards with Raisins Redux

Coarse sea salt
2 large bunches collard greens, ribs removed, cut into a Chiffonade, rinsed and drained
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
2/3 cup raisins
1/3 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

In a large pot over high heat, bring 3 quarts of water to a boil and add 1 tablespoons salt. Add the collards and cook, uncovered, for 8 to 10 minutes, until softened. Meanwhile, prepare a large bowl of ice water to cool the collards.

Remove the collards from the heat, drain, and plunge them into the bowl of cold water to stop cooking and set the color of the greens. Drain by gently pressing the greens against a colander.

In a medium-size sauté pan, combine the olive oil and the garlic and raise the heat to medium. Sauté for 1 minute. Add the collards, raisins, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add orange juice and cook for an additional 15 seconds. Do not overcook (collards should be bright green). Season with additional salt to taste if needed and serve immediately. (This also makes a tasty filling for quesadillas.)

From Vegan Soul Kitchen: Fresh, Healthy, and Creative African-American Cuisine, Bryant Terry

Also available here: http://splendidtable.publicradio.org/recipes/sides_citrus_collards.shtml

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Parsnip Puree with Sauteed Brussels Sprouts

  • 3 pounds parsnips, peeled, quartered lengthwise, and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 3/4 stick unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 10 ounces Brussels sprouts
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons water

Cook parsnips in a 5-to 6-quart pot of boiling water with 1 tablespoon salt, covered, until very tender, 15 to 20 minutes, then drain.

Purée hot parsnips with butter, milk, and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a food processor until smooth. Season with salt, then transfer to a serving dish and keep warm, covered.

Meanwhile, remove and reserve all but smallest leaves from Brussels sprouts, trimming stem ends as necessary.

Heat oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium-high heat until it shimmers, then cook leaves, tossing occasionally, until browned in patches, 2 to 3 minutes. Add water and cook, tossing, until leaves are slightly wilted and water has evaporated, 1 to 2 minutes. Season with salt and scatter leaves over parsnip purée.

From Epicurous via by Shelley Wiseman, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/parsnip-puree-with-sauteed-brussels-sprouts-leaves-350640

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Shaved Kohlrabi with Apple and Hazelnuts

  • 1/2 cup blanched hazelnuts
  • 2 medium kohlrabi (about 2 pounds total), peeled, thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 1 tart apple (such as Pink Lady or Crispin), peeled, cored, thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar or white balsamic vinegar
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup torn fresh mint leaves, plus more for serving
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 ounces Pecorino di Fossa or Parmesan, shaved (about 1/4 cup)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Toast hazelnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing occasionally, until golden brown, 10–12 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop.

Toss kohlrabi, apple, lemon zest, lemon juice, and vinegar in a medium bowl; season with salt. Add 1/2 cup mint and gently toss to just combine.

Toss toasted hazelnuts and oil in a small bowl to coat; season with salt.

Divide kohlrabi salad among plates and top with seasoned hazelnuts, Pecorino, and more mint.

DO AHEAD: Hazelnuts can be toasted 1 day ahead; store airtight at room temperature.

From Epicurous via by Ignacio Mattos, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/shaved-kohlrabi-with-apple-and-hazelnuts-51214700

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Summer CSA Share – #24

Welcome to the 24th share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Leeks
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Celeriac (aka Celery Root)
  • Broccoli
  • Garlic
  • Radishes
  • Mixed Sweet Peppers
  • Savoy Cabbage
  • Mixed Tomatoes
  • Black Futsu Winter Squash – A rare Japanese squash variety related to butternut, black futsu stores well and is versatile in use, even being delicious when cut thin and eaten raw or pickled.
  • Eastern Rise Winter Squash – An orange kabocha variety with a sweet, nutty flavor.

Happy Halloween!  It’s officially the season of foggy mornings, amazingly colorful trees, and (my favorite) pumpkins!  I’ve long been a sucker for a good carving jack and through our farming years I’ve come to love their kin, the winter squash, just as much.  You may have noticed our fondness for winter squash as so many different varieties have been showing up in your shares these past few weeks.  With no winter CSA on the horizon, we’ve been loading you up with a sampling of all the 15+ winter squash varieties we grew this season.  Hopefully you’re enjoying the breadth of squash options, though if you’re not quite keeping up you’re in luck as most varieties will also store into the new year.

This year we changed up several of our variety selections to include more dependable and high yielding hybrids based on research out of OSU on winter squash yield and storage variables.  We decreased the number of beds of squash we grew this year, but had solid harvest numbers.  With so many winter squash varieties available on the market, it’s been nice to have some research to guide our decision making process.  This year we grew multiple varieties of spaghetti, butternut, acorn, kabocha, and pie pumpkins.  It’s always been a challenge to narrow down the specific varieties come planning and seed ordering time, and having some data to back up those decisions this year was helpful.

We’ve got a few more winter squash varieties headed your way in the next three weeks before the season ends culminating with pie pumpkins for your Thanksgiving pies!

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Potato, Green Cabbage, and Leek Soup with Lemon Creme Fraiche

  • 1/2 cup crème fraîche or sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 cups diced green cabbage (1/2-inch dice; from about 1/2 medium head)
  • 3 cups chopped leeks (white and pale green parts only; 3 to 4 large)
  • 3 large garlic cloves, pressed
  • 3 cups 1/2-inch cubes peeled Yukon Gold potatoes (about 1 1/4 pounds)
  • 1 2 x 2-inch piece Parmesan cheese rind (optional)
  • 1 Turkish bay leaf
  • 6 cups (or more) low-salt chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives (for garnish)

Whisk crème fraîche, lemon juice, and lemon peel in small bowl to blend. Cover and chill. DO AHEAD: Can be made 4 hours ahead. Keep chilled.

Melt 1 tablespoon butter with 1 tablespoon olive oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add cabbage; sprinkle lightly with salt and freshly ground black pepper and sauté until cabbage is almost tender but not brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer 1 cup cabbage to small bowl and reserve for garnish.

Add 1 tablespoon butter to pot with cabbage; add leeks and garlic. Sauté over medium heat until leeks soften slightly, about 3 minutes. Stir in potatoes, Parmesan rind, if desired, and bay leaf. Add 6 cups broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer until all vegetables are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Discard Parmesan rind, if using, and bay leaf. Working in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return puree to pot. Simmer until heated through, adding more broth by 1/4 cupfuls to thin soup to desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

Ladle soup into bowls. Top each serving with some of reserved sautéed cabbage. Drizzle crème fraîche mixture over soup; sprinkle with chives and serve.

From Epicurous via by Maria Helm Sinskey, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/potato-green-cabbage-and-leek-soup-with-lemon-creme-fraiche-364109

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Potato & Celery Root Gratin with Leeks

  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 sprig thyme plus 3 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, divided
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter, divided
  • 3 leeks, white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced crosswise
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled, very thinly sliced crosswise (1/8″ thick)
  • 1 pound celery root, peeled, very thinly sliced crosswise (1/8″ thick)
  • 2 cups grated Gruyère
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat cream, garlic, and thyme sprig in a medium saucepan just until bubbles begin to form around edge of pan. Remove from heat; set aside to steep.

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add leeks; season with salt and cook, stirring often, until tender (do not brown), 10-12 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

Butter a 3-quart gratin dish with remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Layer 1/3 of potato slices and 1/3 of celery root slices evenly over bottom of baking dish. Cover with 1/3 of leeks, then 1/3 of Gruyère. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and 1 teaspoon thyme leaves. Repeat layers twice more. Strain cream mixture into a medium pitcher and pour over vegetables.

Set gratin dish on a large rimmed baking sheet and cover tightly with foil. Bake for 1 hour. Carefully remove foil; continue baking until top is golden brown and sauce is bubbling, 25-30 minutes. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Tent with foil and rewarm in a 300° oven until hot, about 20 minutes.

From Epicurous via by Susan Spungen, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/potato-celery-root-gratin-with-leeks-368278

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Roasted Oysters with Pickled Radishes, Carrots, and Celery Root

For the Oysters:

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup minced leek (white part)
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • Salt and pepper
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 20 oysters on the half shell (detached from the bottom shells)

For the pickled radishes etc:

  • 1/2 cup minced radishes
  • 1/2 cup minced carrot
  • 1/2 cup minced celery root
  • 3/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt

For the dish:

  • 5 cups rock salt
  • 1/4 cup pickled radishes, carrots, and celery root
  • 2 tablespoons minced chives

For the Pickled radishes etc:

Put the radishes, carrots and celery root in a medium bowl. In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, water, the sugar and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring until the sugar and salt are dissolved. Pour the pickling liquid over the radishes, carrots and celery, and cover with a plate to keep them submerged. Let cool to room temperature.

Cover the bowl with plaster wrap and refrigerate for about an hour. Transfer the pickles and liquid to a container, cover and refrigerate.

For the Oysters:

In a medium skillet, heat the oil over medium-low-heat. Add the leek, shallot and garlic and cook until soft, about 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and set aside to cool. Meanwhile, make the brown butter. In a small skillet, cook the butter over medium heat, swirling the pan, until the better melts and the milk solids turn golden brown, about 3 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Preheat the oven to 450°F, or prepare an outdoor grill and let the coals burn until they turn white.

To keep the oysters from tipping, spread the rock salt in a large baking pan and nestle the oyster in the salt, being careful not to spill the juices. With a spoon, gently lift each oyster from the shell, slip about 1/4 teaspoon of the cooked leek mixture into the shell, and set the oyster on top. Drizzle with a little brown butter.

Bake in the over or cook on the grill until the oysters are just heated through, about 5 minutes. Top each oyster with a few pieces of pickled radishes, carrots, celery root and chives.

From Epicurous via The Gramercy Tavern Cookbook by Michael Anthony, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/roasted-oysters-with-pickled-radishes-carrots-and-celery-root

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Summer CSA Share – #23

Welcome to the 23rd share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Rutabaga – One of the oft overlooked roots, rutabagas offer a pleasantly pungent addition to roasted vegetables, mashed potatoes, and soups.
  • Carrots
  • Elephant Garlic – Don’t let the large bulbs scare you!  Elephant garlic is related to leeks and has a similarly mild allium flavor.
  • Green Curly Kale
  • Broccoli
  • Yellow Onion
  • Bora King Radishes – It’s fall radish season!  Don’t overlook the greens on these, treat them like mustard greens.
  • Peppers
  • Cauliflower
  • Mixed Tomatoes – mixed pints
  • Celery
  • Festival Acorn Squash
  • Winter Sweet Winter Squash – a drier fleshed kabocha type that stores well, perhaps even improving in flavor over time.
  • Mixed Dry Beans – You’ll want to soak these beans to let any debris and immature beans float to the surface for removal.

The past couple of weeks I’ve been spending a couple of days helping out at our friend’s seed farm.  They grow a huge diversity of seeds that run the gamut from flowers to vegetables and sell them through their seed company, Adaptive Seeds.  It’s been a nice diversion from the work of wrapping up our own season and I think I’ve even proved useful at times.

This is a busy time of year in the seed production world as many season-long crops are just now ready for seed processing.  We’ve grown a handful of varieties for them on our farm over the past several years so I have some experience cleaning seed, but it’s been enjoyable to see how they tackle the work.  Each crop takes a slightly different strategy, a slightly different combination of threshing, screening, and winnowing tactics. The large podded bean seeds drop readily into the bucket while their dry pods fly away in the fan breeze.  The tiny, lightweight lettuce seeds require less of a breeze during winnowing in front of the fan.  They also amazingly sort out by weight with the heaviest and most viable seeds dropping into the bucket and the immature seeds drifting further away.  It’s been nice to learn tips from these folks who have cleaned so much seed, and also to do this work with the proper tools.  They’re set up for it, whereas I always had to spend some time constructing a work station and remembering the best practices.

This week we’re including dry beans in the share.  Jeff has taken on the winnowing job and you can imagine him standing in front a box fan, pouring beans into the wind, watching the chaff separate off as the beans plunk into the bucket below.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Rutabagas with Caramelized Onions

  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
  • 1 3/4 pounds onions, halved, thinly sliced
  • 2 1/4 pounds rutabagas, peeled, cut into 1/2- to 3/4-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons honey

Melt 5 tablespoons butter in heavy large skillet over medium-low heat. Add onions and sauté until brown, 40 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook rutabagas in large pot of boiling salted water until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain well.

Melt 3 tablespoons butter in large skillet over medium-low heat. Add rutabagas; sauté until heated through, about 10 minutes. Drizzle honey over. Gently stir in onions. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 3 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Rewarm over medium-low heat.)

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/rutabagas-with-caramelized-onions-4677

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Winter Squash and Chicken Stew with Indian Spices

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 6 chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 1/3 cups chopped onion
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 4 cups 1-inch pieces peeled butternut or acorn squash
  • 2 cups 1-inch pieces peeled russet potatoes
  • 1 cup canned low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 14 1/2- to 16-ounce can diced tomatoes with liquid
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

Heat 1 teaspoon oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Add to Dutch oven; sauté until brown on all sides, about 8 minutes. Transfer to plate.

Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in same pot over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic; sauté until golden, about 5 minutes. Add curry powder, cumin, and cinnamon; stir 1 minute. Return chicken to pot. Add squash, potatoes, broth and tomatoes. Cover and simmer 15 minutes. Uncover and simmer until chicken and potatoes are cooked through and liquid is slightly reduced, about 8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with cilantro.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/winter-squash-and-chicken-stew-with-indian-spices-876

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Vinegar-Marinated Chicken with Buttered Greens and Radishes

  • 2 pounds skin-on bone-in chicken thighs
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 8 radishes, quartered, halved if small
  • 1 bunch mustard greens, leaves torn (or try kale and radish greens)
  • 4 tablespoons tarragon leaves, divided

Season chicken with salt and pepper and place in a large baking dish. Pour 1/4 cup vinegar over chicken and let sit 15–20 minutes. Remove chicken from marinade and pat skin dry. Reserve baking dish (no need to wipe it out).

Preheat oven to 400°F. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Working in batches, cook chicken, skin side down, until skin is golden brown and crisp, 8–10 minutes; turn and cook until other side is just browned, about 4 minutes. Transfer chicken to reserved baking dish; reserve skillet. Bake chicken until cooked through and an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part registers 165°F, 10–12 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat butter in same skillet over medium-high. Add radishes, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until radishes are browned and tender, about 5 minutes. Add mustard greens and toss to coat; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until mustard greens are just wilted, about 2 minutes (they should still have some spring in their step). Add 2 tablespoons tarragon and remaining 1 tablespoon vinegar; toss to combine.

Serve greens and radishes with chicken topped with remaining 2 tablespoons tarragon.

From Epicurous via https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/vinegar-marinated-chicken-with-buttered-greens-and-radishes-56389531

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Summer CSA Share – #22

Welcome to the 22nd share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Kohlrabi
  • Beets
  • Leeks
  • Arugula & Mizuna & Romaine Mix
  • Broccoli
  • Garlic
  • Carola Yellow Potatoes
  • Liebesapfel Sweet Pimento Peppers
  • Cauliflower
  • Mixed Tomatoes – slicers and mixed pints
  • Parsley
  • Spaghetti Squash

Last Chance for P&C Pork Halves! – We’re selling halves of pork that will be ready for pick-up in a couple of weeks.  The on-farm slaughter happened this morning and we’re giving buyer’s names to the butcher tomorrow.  If you think you might be interested, check out the details here and send us an email if you’d like to buy a half ASAP.

As we announced last week, we’ve made the big decision to step away from farming and sell the farm.  As we wrap up these last weeks of the CSA season we’re also working on wrapping up our lives here on the farm and are focused on the transition of finding the next owner and making the decisions about where we’re headed next.  It’s a bittersweet process of endings and beginnings.  This moody October weather feels fitting for this moment, with the interspersed dense foggy mornings, days of gorgeous fall sunshine, and rainstorms rolling through.

This is the time of year that we would generally be putting the farm to bed, preparing for the coming winter months, and finishing up the planting season with garlic for next year.  Now we find ourselves doing things for the last time.  Our last winter squash harvest, our final seeding of cover crop on open ground, the last of the transplanting.  Admittedly it’s a little surreal to look around at winter crops, not knowing who might be harvesting the purple sprouting broccoli next spring, or if it will even be harvested or just tilled under.  There’s a mix of the things we won’t miss, like the obnoxious turnip weed in the back field, and the things I realize I’ve taken for granted, like having tools and ladders whenever we needed them.  This was a big week as we put the farm up for sale.  It’s really happening.  Now to try our hardest to enjoy these final weeks of the CSA season and our time as your farmers!

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Roasted Cauliflower with Lemon-Parsley Dressing

  • 1 head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets, including tender leaves
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Preheat oven to 425°F. Toss cauliflower and 4 tablespoons oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and golden brown, 25–30 minutes.

Meanwhile, pulse parsley, lemon juice, and remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a food processor until very finely chopped; season with salt and pepper. Toss cauliflower with lemon-parsley mixture and top with lemon zest.

DO AHEAD: Lemon-parsley mixture can be made 4 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/roasted-cauliflower-with-lemon-parsley-dressing-51198450

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Italian Parsley and Beet Salad

  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil plus more for drizzling
  • 2 1/4 pounds assorted beets with greens (such as Chioggia, white, golden, and red; 1 1/2 pounds if already trimmed)
  • 1/4 small red onion
  • 1 1/4 cups Italian (flat-leaf) parsley leaves (from 1 bunch), torn if desired
  • Equipment: an adjustable-blade slicer
  • Accompaniment: fresh ricotta or farmer cheese, or grated ricotta salata

Whisk together juices, oil, and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a large bowl.

Trim beets, leaving 1 inch of stems attached, then peel.

Using stems as a handle, slice beets paper-thin (less than 1/8 inch thick) with slicer (wear protective gloves to avoid staining hands), then cut slices into very thin matchsticks.

Thinly slice onion with slicer.

Toss beets, onion, and parsley with dressing and season with salt. Let stand, tossing occasionally, 30 minutes to soften beets and allow flavors to develop.

Toss again and season with salt and pepper before serving drizzled with additional oil.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/italian-parsley-and-beet-salad-354973

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Spaghetti Squash with Moroccan Spices

  • 1 (3 1/2- to 4-pound) spaghetti squash
  • 1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

Pierce squash (about an inch deep) all over with a small sharp knife to prevent bursting. Cook in an 800-watt microwave oven on high power (100 percent) for 6 to 7 minutes. Turn squash over and microwave until squash feels slightly soft when pressed, 8 to 10 minutes more. Cool squash for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a small heavy saucepan over moderately high heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Stir in spices and salt and remove from heat.

Carefully halve squash lengthwise (it will give off steam) and remove and discard seeds. Working over a bowl, scrape squash flesh with a fork, loosening and separating strands as you remove it from skin. Toss with spiced butter and cilantro.

Cook’s note:
•Alternatively, you can bake the squash in a preheated 350°F oven for 1 to 1 1/4 hours.

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Summer CSA Share – #21

Welcome to the 21st share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Carrots
  • Celeriac – aka celery root, this root vegetable packs a celery flavor and is a wonderful addition to soups and stews or any potato dish.
  • Green Cabbage
  • Broccoli
  • Garlic
  • LaRatte Fingerling Potatoes – a French heirloom variety with a slightly nutty flavor that is excellent roasted or boiled.
  • Peppers
  • Lacinato Kale
  • Mixed Tomatoes – slicers and mixed pints
  • Radishes
  • Fennel
  • Butternut Winter Squash
  • Pears – Depending on your softness/ripeness preference, you may want to let these spend some time on your counter top.

P&C Pork Still Available! – We’re selling halves of pork that will be ready for pick-up late-October.  If you think you might be interested, check out the details here and send us an email if you’d like to reserve a half.

Fun at the farm open house last weekend. (photos by Jeff)

Many thanks to everyone that made it out to Saturday’s farm open house despite the sketchy weather.  The rain held off for the most part and pumpkins were picked, tractor rides taken, and cider pressed.  We hope you had a fun time on the farm!  It’s really wonderful to see so many farm members enjoy this place.

We announced a little over a month ago that we were taking a break from farming and forgoing the winter CSA.  We hope you’ve explored other local winter CSA options.  We wanted to let you know that we’ve decided to step away from farming completely for the meantime and we’ll be selling the farm at the end of the season.  Please know that we’re totally committed to the last six weeks of this CSA season and our remaining time together should be no different than any of our previous seven fall CSA seasons together.

We wholeheartedly appreciate your support these past nine years while we figured out how to farm and how to build a life around farming.  We could not have done it without you and growing food for this community has been an extremely rewarding endeavor.  It’s time for us to move on to new challenges , though we’re not entirely sure what those will be just yet.  We’ve gained a certain level of resiliency through this farming journey and have no doubt that things will work out.  We sincerely hope you’ve enjoyed your time as farm members and will continue to support other local farmers in the future.

But you’re not done with us just yet!  As we countdown to the end of the season and Thanksgiving we’ll be relishing in the lasts of the CSA and farming.  We’re working to make it the best season yet and look forward to seeing you all a few more times before we wrap things up for good.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Celery Root and Carrot Soup

  • 1/2 large celery root (celeriac), peeled, chopped
  • 1/2 pound carrots, peeled, chopped
  • 1/4 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated peeled ginger
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • Celery leaves and chopped Granny Smith apple (for serving)

Place celery root and carrots in a large pot; add 6 cups water. Bring to a simmer over medium heat; cook until tender, 30–35 minutes. Let cool slightly. Purée in a blender with yogurt, honey, coriander, and ginger until smooth; season with salt and pepper.

Serve soup topped with celery leaves and apple.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/celery-root-and-carrot-soup

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Cabbage, Fresh Fennel, and Carrot Slaw

  • 1 2 1/2-pound cabbage, quartered, cored, very thinly sliced (about 18 cups)
  • 2 fresh fennel bulbs, trimmed, halved, very thinly sliced (about 3 cups)
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 very large carrot, peeled, coarsely shredded
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Combine cabbage, fennel, onion, and carrot in large bowl. Whisk mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, sugar, and hot sauce in medium bowl to blend. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper. Add dressing to cabbage mixture; toss to coat. Season slaw to taste with salt and pepper. Refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 2 hours, tossing occasionally. Transfer to serving bowl.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/cabbage-fresh-fennel-and-carrot-slaw-109679

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Pork Stew with Fennel and Butternut Squash

  • 3 pounds 2-inch pieces trimmed pork shoulder (Boston butt)
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried rubbed sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped thinly sliced pancetta* (about 4 ounces)
  • 2 cups chopped onions
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
  • 2 cups low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 2 large fresh fennel bulbs; fronds chopped and reserved, bulbs cut into 1-inch cubes (about 5 cups)
  • 20 1 1/2-inch cubes peeled butternut squash (part of 3-pound squash)

Place pork in large bowl. Mix next 6 ingredients in small bowl; sprinkle over pork, turning pork to coat evenly. Let stand 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat oil in large ovenproof pot over medium-high heat. Add pancetta and sauté until beginning to brown, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer pancetta to medium bowl. Add half of pork to pot; sauté until brown, about 8 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer pork to bowl with pancetta. Repeat with remaining pork. Add onions and garlic to pot; sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes with juices, broth, wine, and pork mixture. Bring to boil, scraping up browned bits.

Cover pot; place in oven. Cook stew 1 hour. Add fennel bulbs, chopped fronds, and squash cubes to stew. Cover and cook in oven until pork and vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer meat and vegetables to large bowl; cover. Boil sauce over medium-high heat until thickened enough to coat spoon, about 25 minutes. Return meat and vegetables to sauce; season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool 30 minutes. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled.) Rewarm over low heat.

*Pancetta, Italian bacon cured in salt, is available at Italian markets and some specialty foods stores and supermarkets.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/pork-stew-with-fennel-and-butternut-squash-107648

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Summer CSA Share – #20

Welcome to the 20th share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Carrots
  • Mixed Eggplant
  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Yellow Onion
  • Jimmy Nardello SWEET Peppers
  • Collards
  • Mixed Tomatoes – slicers and mixed pints
  • Mixed Beans – Green filet beans and purple striped dragon’s tongue
  • Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Winter Squash
  • Pears – Depending on your softness/ripeness preference, you may want to let these spend some time on your counter top.

P&C Pork Available! – We’re selling halves of pork that will be ready for pick-up mid-October.  If you think you might be interested, check out the details here and send us an email if you’d like to reserve a half.

a hoverfly on a strawflower (left) and this week’s mixed beans (right)

The Final Farm Visit is scheduled for this Saturday October 7th from noon-5pm.  It will be open house style, with a potluck lunch to kick things off.  We’ll have apples ready for cider pressing, farm tours, and pumpkins to pick from the pumpkin patch.  If the wind picks up we’ll break out the kites.  The event will go on rain or shine, but we’ll plan to set-up under cover if the rain is threatening to dampen the day.  Click here to head to the event page for all the details.

Somehow we’ve made it to October.  The dubious start to this season had us wondering what things would look like this fall, but the weather did its thing and we did our thing and the vegetables did their thing.  Although we can see where we’ve failed along the way this season, beyond our doubts from those early days there are vegetables to be had!  Just seven more veggie packed weeks until Thanksgiving and we all have to reacquaint ourselves with winter farmer’s markets, other winter CSAs, and (gasp) the produce section of the grocery store.  Let’s enjoy the seasonal bounty while we’ve got it.  Hope to see you all Saturday at the farm.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Tangy Eggplant, Long Beans, and Cherry Tomatoes with Roasted Peanuts

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce (preferably naam pla)
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 pound long thin Asian eggplants (about 2)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1/2 pound long beans or other green beans
  • 10 cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1 tablespoon roasted peanuts

In a large bowl stir together fish sauce, sugar, and lime juice and let stand, stirring occasionally, until sugar is dissolved, about 10 minutes.

Preheat broiler.

Cut eggplants crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Lightly brush a small baking pan with some oil and arrange eggplant slices in pan. Brush eggplant with remaining oil and broil 3 to 4 inches from heat, turning it once, until tender and browned, about 8 minutes total. Add eggplant to fish-sauce mixture and toss.

Have ready a bowl of ice and cold water. Cut beans into 1 1/2-inch lengths and in a saucepan cook in boiling salted water 2 minutes. Drain beans and transfer to ice water to stop cooking. Drain beans well and add to eggplant mixture. Halve tomatoes and coarsely chop cilantro. Finely chop peanuts. Add tomatoes, cilantro, and some peanuts to eggplant mixture, tossing to combine. Vegetables may be prepared 2 hours ahead. Serve vegetables at room temperature sprinkled with remaining peanuts.

From Epicurous via

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Spiced Carrot Cauliflower Soup

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 5 cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable bouillon, i like to use organic better than bouillon instead of the cubes
  • 1 head cauliflower, chopped (about 4 cups)
  • 3 cups peeled and chopped carrots (about 8 medium carrots)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat and cook the onions for 3 minutes, or until soft.

Dissolve the vegetable bouillon in the water and add to the pot.

Add the remaining ingredients to the pot and stir to combine.

Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce heat to simmer for 15-20 minutes, or until the vegetables are fork tender.

Using an immersion blender or standing blender, puree all of the ingredients until smooth.

From Epicurous via Weelicious by Catherine Mccord, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/spiced-carrot-cauliflower-soup-51262700

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Sauteed Collards

  • 3 pound collard greens, leaves halved lengthwise and stems and center ribs discarded
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Stack several collard leaf halves and roll up tightly into a cigar shape. Cut crosswise into very thin slices (no wider than 1/8 inch). Roll and slice remaining leaves in same manner.

Heat oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté collards, tossing with tongs, just until bright green, about 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/sauteed-collard-greens-108108.

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Summer CSA Share – #19

Welcome to the 19th share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Beets
  • Adirondack Red Potatoes
  • Parsley
  • Napa Cabbage
  • Mixed Melons
  • Broccoli
  • Leeks
  • Mixed Sweet Peppers
  • Brussels Sprouts Tops – a seasonal treat, these are the tops of our Brussels sprouts plants and are a taste of the sprouts before they’ve formed.  We top our Brussels to help the plants focus their energy on the sprouts.  Cook them like kale or collards.
  • Mixed Tomatoes – slicers and mixed pints
  • Sweet Corn
  • Delicata Winter Squash

P&C Pork Available! – We’re selling halves of pork that will be ready for pick-up mid-October.  If you think you might be interested, check out the details here and send us an email if you’d like to reserve a half.

frog friend in the melon patch (left) and more winter squash harvested (right)

Happy Autumnal Equinox!  Well, a few days past the actual equinox, but the sentiment is the same.  Fall has officially arrived!  After such a long, hot summer there were times I wasn’t sure it would actually happen.  The nights are beginning to grow longer, the air has that crisp fall feeling, and the temperatures seem to have chilled out enough for pleasant field work.  It’s the overlap season, time to make the big switch from summer squash to winter squash, from cucumbers to hardy leafy greens.

With the arrival of Autumn comes the final CSA member farm visit.  The Fall Farm Visit is scheduled for Saturday October 7th from noon-5pm.  It will be open house style, with a potluck lunch to kick things off.  We’ll have apples ready for cider pressing, farm tours, and pumpkins to pick from the pumpkin patch.  Click here to head to the event page for all the details.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Roasted Root Vegetables

  • 1 2 1/2-pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 5 cups)
  • 1 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, unpeeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 bunch beets (about 1 1/2 pounds), trimmed but not peeled, scrubbed, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 medium-size red onion, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 2 cups)
  • 1 large turnip, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 1 cup)
  • 1 head of garlic, cloves separated, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Preheat oven to 425°F. Oil 2 large rimmed baking sheets. Combine all ingredients in very large bowl; toss to coat. Divide vegetables between prepared baking sheets; spread evenly. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Roast vegetables until tender and golden brown, stirring occasionally, about 1 hour 15 minutes. (Can be prepared 2 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Rewarm in 350°F oven 15 minutes.)

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/roasted-root-vegetables-104833

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Salmon and Corn Chowder with Pancetta and Leeks

  • 1/2 pound pancetta,* chopped
  • 3 leeks, chopped (white and pale green parts only)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 5 cups bottled clam juice
  • 1 pound russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 2 cups)
  • 2 cups frozen white corn kernels
  • 2 1/2 pounds skinless salmon fillet, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 cups whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley

Cook pancetta in heavy large pot over medium heat until crisp, about 8 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons fat from pot. Add leeks, bay leaves, and thyme. Sauté until leeks are soft, about 8 minutes. Add clam juice. Increase heat to high and bring to boil. Add potatoes and corn. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 12 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill soup uncovered until cold, then cover and refrigerate. Cover pancetta and refrigerate. Rewarm pancetta in skillet and bring soup to simmer before continuing.) Stir salmon and cream into soup. Simmer until salmon is just cooked through, about 5 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Stir in parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with pancetta.

Pancetta, an Italian bacon cured in salt, is available at Italian markets, specialty foods stores and some supermarkets.

From Epicurous via , https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/salmon-and-corn-chowder-with-pancetta-and-leeks-106195

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Pasta with Delicata Squash and Sage-Brown Butter

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 14 large sage leaves
  • 1/2 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) or plain coarse breadcrumbs
  • 2 medium delicata squash (about 1 3/4 pounds total), halved lengthwise, seeded, sliced crosswise into 1/4″-thick half-moons.
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 12 ounces thick spaghetti or bucatini
  • Thinly shaved Parmesan cheese

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium. Cook, swirling pan occasionally, until butter turns caramel-brown and smells nutty, 2–3 minutes. Add sage leaves and fry until crispy, 10–15 seconds. Remove from heat. Using a slotted spoon, transfer sage to paper towels to drain. Pour all but 2 Tbsp. brown butter into a small bowl.

Cook panko and 4 sage leaves in same skillet, stirring to break up sage, until mixture is toasty, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

Cook squash and 3 Tbsp. brown butter in same skillet over medium heat, stirring frequently, until squash begins to brown, about 5 minutes. Add 1/2 tsp. salt, 1/8 tsp. pepper, and 3/4 cup water; cover pan and cook until squash begins to soften, about 5 minutes. Remove lid and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until liquid has evaporated and squash is tender and caramelized, about 5 minutes more.

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente, 8–10 minutes. Drain, reserving 3/4 cup pasta cooking liquid.

Add remaining 3 Tbsp. brown butter to skillet and stir until squash is evenly coated. Add 1/2 cup pasta cooking liquid and simmer until a thin sauce forms, about 1 minute; season with 1 tsp. pepper. Add pasta, tossing to coat and adding pasta cooking water as needed to coat pasta. Remove from heat, top with half of the reserved sage, and stir to combine.

Transfer pasta to a large serving bowl or individual pasta bowls. Top with panko mixture, remaining sage, and a generous shaving of Parmesan.

From Epicurous via

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Summer CSA Share – #18

Welcome to the 18th share of the Pitchfork & Crow CSA!  Here’s what’s in the share this week:

  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Romaine Head Lettuce
  • Summer Squash
  • Mixed Cucumbers – Slicers, lemons, and picklers
  • Mixed Melons
  • Broccoli
  • Shallots
  • Shishito Peppers
  • Lacinato Kale
  • Mixed Tomatoes – slicers and mixed pints
  • Garlic
  • Sweet Corn
  • ‘Stripetti’ Spaghetti Squash

The first autumn rain of the season is a big deal on the farm.  Summer rainstorms are usually fleeting and followed by more high temps, so the only preparation generally required is moving tractors under cover and rolling up car windows.  The first deluge of fall is a season changer.

Seeing a big rain in the forecast in September sets a countdown for harvesting the season-long storage crops like flour corn and dry beans that have matured and already dried down in the field.  We were generally successful at getting those crops in on Friday with the help of our employee/nephew before the rain arrived.  The popcorn isn’t quite ready so it’s waiting out the damp, hopefully to dry enough in the sunny days next week to resist molding.  We also harvested just under half of our winter squash on Sunday afternoon.  Seeing these dry storage crops doomed to a rainstorm have so many weeks of dry weather and hot days is a real motivator to get them safely under cover.

In between prepping for the rain, we also spent a chunk of the week trying to contain the three not-so-little pigs.  Some trouble with the electric fence charger eventually led to an uncharged fence and three curious pigs outside of the fence.  We eventually corralled them into a hog panel enclosure and Jeff was finally able to get the fence charged again.  But about 5 minutes after we’d let them back into the larger area they’d escaped once again, showing no fear of the electric charge.  After much cajoling  and enticing and general reasoning with the pigs we once again got them contained inside the hog panels.  There’s not much like the feeling in the pit of your stomach when a large farm animal is trotting across an open field toward total freedom with no interest in listening to your pleas to turn around.  I was perhaps the most surprised when they were once again safely fenced in.

That said, it’s time to think about buyers for these three pigs.  We’ll be selling them by the half and the on-farm slaughter date is set for October 17th.  If you think you might be interested, check out the details here and send us an email if you’d like to reserve a half.

Enjoy the vegetables and we’ll see you next week!

Your farmers,
Carri Heisler and Jeff Bramlett

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Here are a few recipes to get you inspired:

Spaghetti Squash with Sausage Filling

  • 1 3 3/4- to 4-pound spaghetti squash, halved lengthwise, seeded
  • 1 pound bulk pork sausage
  • 1 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups purchased marinara sauce
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Wrap squash halves in plastic wrap. Cook 1 at a time in microwave on high until tender, about 8 minutes. Pierce plastic to allow steam to escape. Cool. Meanwhile, sauté sausage, bell pepper, onion and garlic in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat until sausage browns and vegetables are tender, breaking up sausage with back of spoon, about 12 minutes. Mix in marinara sauce.

Using fork, pull out squash strands from shells, leaving shells intact. Mix squash strands into sausage mixture. Season filling to taste with salt and pepper. Spoon filling into squash shells. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover; refrigerate.)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Arrange filled squash halves on baking sheet. Sprinkle each with 1/4 cup Parmesan. Bake uncovered until heated through, about 20 minutes (30 minutes if previously chilled). Cut each squash half in two and serve.

From Epicurous via https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/spaghetti-squash-with-sausage-filling-5673

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Kale, Tomato. and Lemon Magic One-Pot Spaghetti

  • 14 ounces/400 g spaghetti or linguine
  • 14 ounces/400 g cherry tomatoes
  • Zest of 2 large unwaxed lemons
  • 7 tablespoons/100 ml olive oil
  • 2 heaping teaspoons flaky sea salt (if you are using fine-grain table salt, add a bit less)
  • 1 (14-ounce/400-g) bunch of kale or spinach
  • Parmesan cheese (I use a vegetarian one) (optional)

Fill and boil a kettle of water and get all your ingredients and equipment together. You need a large, shallow pan with a lid.

Put the pasta into the pan. Quickly chop the tomatoes in half and throw them into the pan. Grate in the zest of both lemons and add the oil and salt. Add about 1 quart/1 liter of boiling water, put a lid on the pan, and bring back to a boil. Remove the lid and simmer on high heat for 6 minutes, using a pair of tongs to turn the pasta every 30 seconds or so as it cooks.

Meanwhile, remove any tough stalks from the kale or spinach and coarsely tear the leaves. Once the pasta has had 6 minutes, add the kale and continue to cook for a further 2 minutes.

Once almost all the water has evaporated, take the pan off the heat and tangle the pasta into four bowls. If you like, top with a little Parmesan.

From Epicurous via A Modern Way to Cook by Anna Jones, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/kale-tomato-and-lemon-magic-one-pot-spaghetti

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Chicken, Corn, and Noodle Soup with Saffron

  • 9 cups canned low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 3-pound cut-up chicken; neck, gizzard and heart reserved
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups chopped onions
  • 1 cup diced peeled carrots
  • 3/4 cup diced celery
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon crumbled saffron threads
  • 2 ounces dried wide egg noodles
  • 1 cup frozen corn kernels
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons minced celery leaves

Combine broth, chicken pieces, neck, gizzard and heart in large pot. Bring to boil. Reduce heat; cover partially and simmer until chicken is cooked through, about 20 minutes. Using tongs, remove chicken pieces and giblets from broth. Cool slightly. Remove skin from breasts and leg-thigh pieces. Cut enough chicken meat to measure 1 cup. Reserve remaining cooked chicken for another use. Strain broth into large bowl. Chill broth until fat solidifies on surface, about 6 hours. (Broth can be made 2 days ahead. Keep chilled.) Scrape fat from surface of broth and discard.

Melt butter in heavy large pot over medium-low heat. Add onions, carrots, celery, garlic, and thyme. Cover; cook until vegetables soften, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Add broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat; simmer until vegetables are almost tender, about 15 minutes. Add saffron. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill. Bring to boil before continuing.) Add noodles; simmer 5 minutes. Add 1 cup chicken and corn; simmer until noodles are tender, about 5 minutes. Add parsley and celery. Season with salt and pepper.

From Epicurous via https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/chicken-corn-and-noodle-soup-with-saffron-2762

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